Menu
1-888-354-5028
  • Virginia Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (145) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (261) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (43) Alcohol Detox
  • (38) Services for Young Adults
  • (50) Over 50
  • (45) Expectant Mothers
  • (68) Women
  • (66) Men
  • (187) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (72) Spanish Speaking
  • (20) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (137) Dual Diagnosis
  • (72) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (145) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (20) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (35) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (37) Lesbian and Gay
  • (8) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (43) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (9) Transitional Living Services
  • (20) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (26) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (13) Health Services
  • (1) American Indian and Alaska Native Languages
  • (2) Residential Beds for Adolescents
1-888-354-5028

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism causes destruction on a daily basis in the state of Virginia. There is no limit to the devastation that alcohol addiction can create in the communities of Virginia, destroying lives daily. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehabilitation in Virginia offers a new life for those affected by alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Alcohol Rehab isn't easy, but neither is paying the social and physical consequences of a long-term alcohol addiction. Individuals can receive the proper guidance and support needed through counseling, and with the help of specialists get to the root of their addiction. Effective alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Virginia can help the individual get back on the road to a sober and happy life. They will be able to confront life's obstacles head on, instead of running away from them with alcohol.

For individuals in Virginia who have abused alcohol for an extended period of time, physical withdrawal may occur when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal is a very uncomfortable and painful process, and can be potentially deadly. Individuals in Virginia who want to put an end to their addiction to alcohol and seek treatment can be assisted through this process at an alcohol rehab center. Here they can be properly monitored and care for so they can begin the next steps of treatment.

There are a variety of alcohol rehab programs available for individuals in Virginia seeking treatment for alcohol addiction. There are Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehabilitation Facilities, support group meetings for alcoholism, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism can have serious long-term consequences. In the end, it can take your life. Seek alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in Virginia for you or someone you know today, before it is too late.


Virginia alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. 1986 is the year with the most alcohol-related driving deaths reported in Virginia, with 606 fatalities. The lowest level reported is 337, which occurred in 1999. The highest percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related was reported in 1983, with 57%, and the lowest percentage was 36%, reported in 2001 and again in 2006, showing a fairly steady decline. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 36% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 51% in 1983.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Virginia, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Virginia drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration ( BAC ) value." The fatality rates shown below refer to the total number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

881

493

56

438

50

1983

901

518

57

462

51

1984

1,013

572

56

504

50

1985

976

496

51

433

44

1986

1,126

606

54

513

46

1987

1,021

527

52

452

44

1988

1,072

501

47

427

40

1989

1,004

466

46

403

40

1990

1,079

540

50

460

43

1991

948

430

45

381

40

1992

839

373

44

325

39

1993

879

398

45

341

39

1994

930

385

41

340

37

1995

900

373

41

315

35

1996

877

353

40

307

35

1997

984

398

40

339

34

1998

935

359

38

303

32

1999

878

337

38

280

32

2000

929

360

39

303

33

2001

935

339

36

289

31

2002

914

379

41

327

36

2003

943

364

39

309

33

2004

925

359

39

307

33

2005

947

347

37

284

30

2006

961

347

36

300

31

2007

1,027

397

39

22

34

2008

824

365

44

294

36

2003-2004 Virginia Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

7.22%

[39th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

13.7%

[33rd of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

54%

[33rd of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.6%

[31st of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

359

[17th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.474 per 10,000 people

[35th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

39%

[21st of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

50.24%

[28th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Virginia?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Virginia age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Virginia, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in Virginia are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Virginia

  • A first-time offender in Virginia faces up to 12 months in jail and a fine of $250 to $2,500. If, however, the offender's BAC was at least .15, but not more than .20, there is an additional mandatory minimum jail term of five days. If the offender's BAC was more than .20, the additional mandatory minimum jail term is 10 days. First-time offenders will have their driving privileges suspended for one year.
  • A person who commits a second DWI in Virginia within five years of the first offense faces one month to one year in jail and a fine of $250 to $2,500. If, however, the second offense occurred within 10 years of the first offense and the offender's BAC was at least .15 but not more than .20, there is an additional mandatory minimum jail term of 10 days. If the offender's BAC was more than .20, the additional mandatory minimum jail term is 20 days. Also, the offender will be fined a mandatory minimum fine of $500, but the fine can be as high as $2,500. Those who commit a second offense within 10 years of the first will have their driver's licenses revoked for three years.
  • A person convicted of three DWI offenses in Virginia in a 10-year period is subject to one to five years in prison and a fine of $1,000 to $2,500. If, however, the three offenses were committed within a five-year period, the mandatory minimum prison term is six months. Third-time offenders will have their driver's licenses revoked indefinitely.
  • A person who is convicted of a fourth or subsequent DWI in Virginia in a 10-year period is subject to one to five years in prison and a fine of $1,000 to $2,500. Those who commit a fourth or subsequent offense will have their driver's licenses revoked indefinitely.

Additional Penalties for Drunk Driving While Accompanied by a Child 17 or Under
A person convicted of DWI in Virginia while transporting a child 17 or under will be fined an additional $500 to $1,000 and must serve at least five days in jail.

Ignition Interlock
The sentencing judge may order a first-time offender to use an ignition interlock device for up to one year after the offender's driver's license is restored. Those who commit a second or subsequent offense and those who commit a DWI with a BAC of .15 or more must use an ignition interlock device for at least six months after driving privileges are restored. The judge can, however, order these offenders use the device for a period of time not to exceed the period of the license suspension.

Commercial Drivers
In addition to other penalties that may apply under Virginia's DWI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DWI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the driver was operating a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. A commercial driver in Virginia who commits a second DWI while driving any vehicle within a 10-year period will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21
A driver under 21 in Virginia who commits a DWI will forfeit his or her driver's license for six months and be fined up to $500. A person who commits underage DWI may also be required to attend an alcohol safety action program and drive on a restricted license. If the offender is 18 or older and his or her BAC measured .08 or more, the offender may be subject to the penalties applicable to drunk drivers 21 and older.

Dram Shop
Virginia does not have a dram shop act.

Criminal Liability for Selling Alcohol to Minors
It is a crime for a licensed drinking establishment to sell alcohol to persons under 21. A violation of this law subjects the offender to up to 12 months in jail, a fine of up to $2,500, or both.

Criminal Liability for Furnishing Alcohol to Minors
It is a crime for a person to furnish alcohol to a person under 21. Violators face up to 12 months in jail, a fine of up to $2,500, or both. These offenders will also have their driver's licenses suspended for up to one year.

  • Contact Us
  • Youth in markets with high advertising expenditures ($10 or more per person per month) increase their alcohol consumption more over time, reaching a peak of 50 drinks per month by age 25.
  • Approximately 10 to 15 million people in the U.S. are alcoholics or problem drinkers.
  • Most underage youth who drink report binge drinking, usually on multiple occasions.
  • Excessive alcohol consumption in college not only interferes with the successful transition to campus life, but can lead to unhealthy long-term drinking patterns.

For more information, visit www.drug-rehabs.org.